project-1

Bioethics Casebook in End-of-Life Care

HOW CAN BETTER DECISION-MAKING BE FOSTERED FOR ELDERCARE AND END-OF-LIFE CARE?

As part of our interests to foster better practices in healthcare professionals, we funded the Centre for Biomedical Ethics (CBmE) at the NUS Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine to work on an online casebook entitled Making Difficult Decisions with Patients and Families: A Singapore Casebook.,

The objectives were to promote learning, teaching and discussion among healthcare professionals, medical students and teachers, by addressing some of the most complex but common issues in Singaporean healthcare, including care for the elderly and end-of-life care.


WHAT IS THE SCOPE OF THE STUDY?

This pioneering effort brought togetherover 50 healthcare professionals, and in academic consultations with The Hastings Center, New York and The Ethox Centre, University of Oxford. Featuring 12 hypothetical cases, its information was based on real settings in acute, community and home care, gleaned from lengthy interviews with the healthcare professionals as well as workshops, conferences and discussion forums.

The cases span a range of challenges in ethical decision-making relating to the care of young, adult and elderly patients. They come complete with questions for reflection, expert commentaries and perspectives provided by Singapore clinicians. Other information, such as articles on medical law in Singapore, the Mental Capacity Act, healthcare financing and a glossary of key terms, are also available on the online portal.


HOW CAN THE CASEBOOK SERVE AS A REFERENCE POINT FOR END-OF-LIFE CAREGIVERS?

Doctors, patients and families often struggle with decisions in healthcare. With advances in medical technology and therapeutics, the ground for options and questions has widened. The Casebook has provided doctors with a safe platform to collectively share, navigate and resolve conflicts that commonly arise from caring for the sick and the dying.

The Casebook is CBmE’s second collaborative project with the Lien Foundation. It was proposed as a way to continue discussions among physicians, caregivers, patients and policymakers following the earlier ethics research publication, “What Doctors Say About Care of the Dying", released in 2011.

To view the Casebook, visit www.bioethicscasebook.sg.

 

PRESS RELEASE